Pastor Mark’s Devotions, May 18

“Perspective”

Look at the birds of the air; they do not sow or reap or store away in barns, and yet your Father feeds them.” Matthew 6:26

 

Last week, I received the email that is reprinted below. The article peeked my curiosity because it asked me to imagine that I was born in 1900. My mom’s dad, Oskar Johnson was born in 1900. Today is his wife’s, my grandmother’s birthday. Josephine Johnson was born on May 18, 1902. My grandparents, on my dad’s side, were born in the years, 1881 and 1889 respectively. Sometimes, it seems incredible that one of my grandparents was born only 16 years after the Civil War. All my grandparents were born and raised in South Dakota. Oskar Johnson and Frank Bankson both died of cancer years before I was born. Oskar was a farmer, who died of lung cancer in 1939. My mom was 8 years old. The family moved into the tiny town of Worthing, south of Sioux Falls. They lost the farm and opened a small oil and gas business. My uncle Bob joined the Navy and went off to fight in WWII. He returned to help his mom work the gas and oil business for the rest of his life. Eventually, my mom left home and attended Augustana College in Sioux Falls, where she met my dad.

Grandma “J”, as we would call her, visited our family many times in California. We also returned to visit her in South Dakota, in the summer, every other year. Grandma J died in her early 80’s. At the time, I thought she had lived a good, long life. Now, it doesn’t seem quite as long as it once did. Sometimes we heard stories about her growing up as a young girl. She grew up with no running water and no indoor plumbing. She attended a one room school house. At times, it was a long bitter cold walk to school. She grew up with no telephone and few automobiles. Flying across the country and flying to the moon were absolutely unimaginable.

The following article continues to paint an even clearer picture of what that generation experienced and had to endure. Gaining a broader perspective is always a good thing. I’m thankful for my grandparents who endured many hardships yet still kept a strong faith. I pray that we all will do the same!

 

Keeping Things in Perspective

 

Maybe we don’t have it that bad?

It’s a mess out there now. Hard to discern between what’s a real threat and what is just simple panic and hysteria. For a small amount of perspective at this moment,

Imagine you were born in 1900. 

On your 14th birthday, World War I starts, and ends on your 18th birthday. 22 million people perish in that war. Later in the year, a Spanish Flu epidemic hits the planet and runs until your 20th birthday. 50 million people die from it in those two years. Yes, 50 million. 

On your 29th birthday, the Great Depression begins. Unemployment hits 25%, the World GDP drops 27%. That runs until you are 33. The country nearly collapses along with the world economy. 

When you turn 39, World War II starts. You aren’t even over the hill yet. And don’t try to catch your breath. On your 41st birthday, the United States is fully pulled into WWII. Between your 39th and 45th birthday, 75 million people perish in the war. 

Smallpox was epidemic until you were in your 40’s, as it killed 300 million people during your lifetime.  

At 50, the Korean War starts. 5 million perish. From your birth, until you are 55 you dealt with the fear of Polio epidemics each summer. You experience friends and family contracting polio and being paralyzed and/or die.  

At 55 the Vietnam War begins and doesn’t end for 20 years. 4 million people perish in that conflict. During the Cold War, you lived each day with the fear of nuclear annihilation. On your 62nd birthday you have the Cuban Missile Crisis, a tipping point in the Cold War. Life on our planet, as we know it, almost ended. When you turn 75, the Vietnam War finally ends.

Think of everyone on the planet born in 1900. How did they endure all of that? When you were a kid in 1985 and didn’t think your 85 year old grandparent understood how hard school was. And how mean that kid in your class was. Yet they survived through everything listed above. Perspective is an amazing art. Refined and enlightening as time goes on. Let’s try and keep things in perspective. Your parents and/or grandparents were called to endure all of the above – you have been called to stay at home and stay six feel apart.

The sun is shining. The birds are singing. Thank you, Lord, for another beautiful day.

God Bless You All,

 

Pastor Mark

 



Pastor Mark’s Devotions, April 2

“The Point of Pain”

“But this happened that we might not rely on ourselves but on God who raises the dead.” 1 Cor. 1:9

In previous devotions, I touched on “The Power of Praise” and “The Purpose of Pause”. Today, I’d like to try to tackle, “The Point of Pain”.

People are experiencing an enormous amount of pain these days. They are feeling the physical pain of fevers, cough and in too many cases, the helplessness of respiratory failure. People are also feeling the emotional pain of isolation and separation, not to mention losing loved ones due to this virus. Doctors and health professionals are feeling the pain of patients passing away and the frustration of inadequate equipment. They are also feeling the painful fear of not being able to protect themselves. Non-essential workers are feeling the pain of unemployment. Parents are feeling the pain of trying to teach their children at home. The country is feeling the general pain of this new normal. And we have no idea how many people are feeling the spiritual pain of feeling forsaken by God. Extracting fact from feeling – while people might feel forsake of God – none of us are truly forsaken – Jesus solved that issue on the cross at Calvary. But in truth; pain remains.

This morning I watched Dr. Fauci respond to another litany of questions during another never-ending interview about this coronavirus. It was painful to watch! It is becoming more obvious the pain this pandemic is playing on him. Now there are even reports regarding threats to his personal welfare. More pain!

St. Paul experienced his own share of painful moments. He opens his second letter to the Corinthian church with these words, “We do not want you to be uninformed, brothers (and sisters), about the painful hardships we suffered in the province of Asia. We were under great pressure, far beyond our ability to endure, so that we despaired even of life. Indeed, in our hearts we felt the sentence of death.” (1:8)

Guaranteed, there are hundreds of thousands of people all across our country who can relate to the pain Paul describes. We hear every night how health workers are beside themselves, not knowing how long they will be able to keep going or if help will come.

In chapter 11, Paul details many of his painful trials:

               “Five times I was beaten with rods, once I was stoned, three times I was shipwrecked, I spent a night and a day in the open sea. I have been constantly on the move. I have been in danger from rivers, in danger from bandits, in danger from my own countrymen, in danger at sea; and in danger from false brothers. I have labored today and toiled and have often gone without sleep; I have known hunger and thirst; I have often gone without food; I have been cold and naked. Besides everything else, I face daily the pressure of my concern for all the churches. Who is weak, and I do not feel weak?”

It feels as if Paul has felt the pain of all our essential workers wrapped up into one person. Hunger, thirst, fatigue, no sleep, DAILY PRESSURE, constantly on the move, danger coming from every direction, and in general – beaten down. Summarized Into one word, OVERWHELMING!!  

Yet Paul, in the midst of all his suffering, he interprets the point of pain. He writes, “But this (all) happened that we might not rely on ourselves but on God, who raises the dead.” His words might sound trite to many today. What can these words mean to people who are flailing about, trying to tread water and simply keep their heads above the waves? But Paul’s declaration must mean more than simple cliché.  Paul, himself, suffered storms that broke him (he despaired of his very life!), yet he remained afloat.

Paul’s mantra remained the same through all the continued mayhem in his life. He captures his conclusions to pain in Philippians 4:19. He confesses, “And MY GOD will meet ALL YOUR NEEDS according to HIS GLORIOUS RICHES in CHRIST JESUS.” Paul found God to be faithful throughout all his painful crisis. In fact, in his book to the Roman Christians, Paul also points out the potential that pain can allow for perseverance, character building, and even in some paradoxical way, joy can be found.

Paul wants his people to understand that pain is not the end of the story. Rather, pain can open another chapter, pointing people to recognize and rely upon the power of God. In his own life, Paul concludes, God is faithful and He will do it!

We must also realize, that Paul was not alone. There are countless others in Scripture who experience pain and point us to the faithfulness of God!

King David, feeling deep emotional pain asks himself rhetorically, “Why are you downcast, O my soul? Why so disturbed within me?” This man, who loves God with all of his heart, is struggling with the pain of depression. But in this moment, he answers his own question; “Put your hope in God, for I will yet praise him, my Savior and my God. (And let’s be clear: God has provided medication to help treat the nine known types of depression today. Praise God!) 

Another case in point, Hannah, the woman chosen to give birth to the prophet Samuel. She too felt deep emotional pain. Unable to conceive, the Scripture reports, “And because the LORD had closed her womb, her rival kept provoking her in order to irritate her. This went on year after year. Whenever Hannah went up to the house of the LORD, her rival provoked her till she wept and would not eat.”        (1 Samuel 1:6-7)

Hannah felt the personal, emotional pain of feeling inadequate and belittled. Yet when God finally blessed her with a child, Hannah lifts a powerful prayer that points us in the same direction as the others. She prays, “My heart rejoices in the LORD; in the LORD my horn is lifted high. My mouth boasts over my enemies, for I delight in your deliverance. It is not by human strength that one prevails; There is no one holy like the LORD; there is no one besides you; there is no Rock like our God.”                               (1 Samuel 2:1-2,9)

Is pain trying to point you in some direction today? Like Paul, David and Hannah, who have suffered before us, may it point us to God. He remains our Rock and our Redeemer, our fortress and refuge in our time of trial.

In Christ,

Pastor Mark